The benefits of the Dancing Classrooms program were recognized in The Atlantic (Jan 22, 2016 )! The article, titled "Learning Empathy through Dance", cites a survey of LA school principals where 66 percent reported an “increased acceptance of others” among their student bodies and 81 percent of students said they treated others with more respect following the program. In NYC, the survey results showed that 95 percent of teachers reported their students improved cooperative and collaborative skills; researchers observed 95 percent of students demonstrating cooperative skills. READ ARTICLE

 
I believe that participating in Dancing Classrooms will yield positive, long-term effects for my students. For some, this program has ignited a love of social dance that will stay with them their entire lives. For others, the ability to try something new, persist through discomfort, and get to a successful conclusion will transfer to new experiences. It was lovely to see students grow in confidence and encourage each other. Some of our quietest students were shining stars on the dance floor.
— Elementary School Principal

 

School Partners

Any school can bring Dancing Classrooms to their students! Each classroom residency costs $4,000, but the school only pays half of that cost, or $2,000 per classroom. Heart of Dance funds the balance. Don’t let cost deter you! We have developed fundraising resource materials for schools and our experienced development staff is happy to support schools with their fundraising efforts if they don’t have funds available in their budget for their portion of the program cost. To date, our Minnesota school partners have had good success in raising their portion of the costs. The residency is offered at no cost to participating students.

This unique arts education residency cultivates essential life skills through the practice of social dance while utilizing a highly developed, CASEL (Coalition for Academic, Social and Emotional Learning) recommended social and emotional learning (SEL) curriculum to create an environment in which each child is connected, respected, and allowed to thrive. 

And our integrated curriculum makes it easy for educators to bring new life and add perspective to standard educational subjects including: reading, writing, math, social studies, geography, music, physical education, and visual arts. 

Administrators and teachers at schools that have adopted Dancing Classrooms report their entire school cultures are positively impacted through the mutual respect, courtesy, and cross-cultural understanding emphasized in the program. 

Student Demographics in Dancing Classrooms
2015-2017 (5 semesters)

Total Schools - 31
Total Classrooms - 126
Total Students - 3,066
70% are on free/reduced lunch - 2,144
37% African American - 1,129
13% Asian - 386
24% Caucasian - 741
1% First Nations - 16
19% Hispanic - 603
6% Two or more races - 191

Bring Dancing Classrooms to your students next school year!

We are working with schools interested in offering the program to their students spring 2018 semester. We are happy to meet with school representatives at their convenience. Please contact us if you would like to bring Dancing Classrooms to your students or if you can connect us with a school that may be interested in bringing this proven and effective program to their fifth or eighth graders!


 
I noticed an increased trust from the get-go. Usually that kind of trust building takes weeks. With dancing, a real trust was created naturally within 2-3 weeks.
— 5th Grade Teacher
Read about the spotlight on Field Elementary School here

Read about the spotlight on Field Elementary School here

LISTEN TO PRINCIPAL KIRK MORRIS AND STUDENTS FROM BENJAMIN E. MAYS IB WORLD SCHOOL TALK WITH HOST CATHY WURZER ON DECEMBER 11, 2015 ABOUT THEIR DANCING CLASSROOMS EXPERIENCE ON MORNING EDITION ON MINNESOTA PUBLIC RADIO. READ ARTICLE.

LISTEN TO PRINCIPAL KIRK MORRIS AND STUDENTS FROM BENJAMIN E. MAYS IB WORLD SCHOOL TALK WITH HOST CATHY WURZER ON DECEMBER 11, 2015 ABOUT THEIR DANCING CLASSROOMS EXPERIENCE ON MORNING EDITION ON MINNESOTA PUBLIC RADIO. READ ARTICLE.